How to wear the multiple hats of a business owner with ease

How to wear the multiple hats of a business owner with ease

By Emma Donovan

Posted on 7th May 2019

As a business owner, you have to wear multiple hats and learn to focus on the ones that are most important right now – acknowledging that they will change along the way. As we approach Yellow Door’s fifth birthday, my top two are securing new clients and leading strategy workshops. In this blog post I’ll unpack this a bit further, share some tips that keep me on track.

My new business director hat

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About 14 months ago we decided to focus on attracting not just bigger clients, but the right clients. Clients that share our values and want a strategic marketing partner to add value to their business over time.

 

I spend more than half of my time on this – and no two days are the same. It ranges from coming up with ways to improve our offering and how we position Yellow Door to networking, meeting potential clients and pouring over spreadsheets!

 

It’s taught me to have patience, to have courage and to really play to my strengths of woo, ideation and communication.

My strategy hat

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This is how I feel when I wake up to run a strategy workshop! In fact, I love everything about them:

 

  • Collaborating with brilliant minds – our clients, our team and often a consultant or two to bring a fresh perspective
  • Quality time – phones are off, and the rest of the world can wait
  • Thinking on my feet – we often go off script, and that’s when the magic happens
  • Creativity – whether it’s a brand story, a marketing plan or a campaign; it’s starting with a clean slate and crafting something new
  • Discovery – we get to learn about an array of industries, suggest ways to incorporate new trends, and improve our offering along the way

Four more hats

In a typical day at the office I also wear hats of an editor, mentor, partner and planner. And the secret is to get the balance right between them. It takes practice, and is a work in progress, but here are seven tips that have helped me to stay sane:

 

  • Start the day with a priority list not a to do list
  • Stay agile
  • Surround yourself with people that you can learn from
  • Ask for help, don’t try to do it all yourself
  • Celebrate the small wins as well as the big ones
  • Set goals
  • Find the balance between the big picture and what needs to happen today

 

If you’d like to work with Yellow Door or find out more about our strategy workshops, pop me an email: emma@theyellowdoor.co.za and we can connect over coffee or Skype.

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Being part of a great team makes copywriting better

Being part of a great team makes copywriting better

By Danielle Scheepers

Posted on 10th April 2019

Ernest Hemingway once said, ‘There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.’ Of course, we are so much more evolved now – we bleed in front of screens.

Dramatic? Granted, but only a little. Writing can be difficult, it takes a lot of focus, and creatives are not known for this trait! The challenges involved in being a digital marketing copywriter in particular include the need to churn out great work at a break neck pace.

 

There is one advantage that Hemingway didn’t have access to which Yellow Door has, an incredible team. Every person in the office plays a specific role in creating authentic, compelling content for our diverse clientele. What follows is insights that I have gained in my time as Yellow Door’s resident copywriter.

Strategy

Not all writers are strategists, but marketing is all about strategy. The fast pace at which the digital world moves means that copy needs to hit the bullseye every time. The only way to make sure that it does so is knowing what information and direction to give the audience and which platform to use.

 

In order to implement this, our team gets together every Tuesday to strategise about a particular client or project and how we can improve our offering. Being part of a small team, everyone has space to share their ideas, and the client benefits from the input of a host of marketing experts with varying skills. For copywriters, this is golden, because it is an opportunity to listen, learn and gain fresh perspective and insight into how to tell the brand’s unique story.

Input

Another notable benefit of such a tight knit agency is having direct access to the bosses. Dom and Em are both incredible in their respective roles and contribute greatly to my growth as a copywriter.

 

Em is our new business director, which means that her focus is always on the horizon. She shares insights and new ventures with the team constantly. Her input into brand guides and company profiles are what refine and direct the process to bring the final product together.

 

Dom, our managing director, directs the daily workflow. This is invaluable, as it keeps things on track. She makes certain that deadlines are achievable and provides encouragement and input into every project. Because, let’s face it, creatives need boundaries!

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Play

As I mentioned earlier, writing can be a difficult practice. Writers are very often their own worst critics. It helps to have a team of people with which you are able to commiserate and also have fun with outside of work.

 

As a team we have danced, celebrated, gone bowling, eaten pizza, hiked and took part in activities that aren’t at all work related. Ultimately, this is almost as important as office hours because it leads to freer thinking and more inspired creativity.

Support

We all deliver the best we can, but there are times when deadlines are tight and things become too demanding to handle alone.

 

Team dynamics at Yellow Door are easy going and we have each other’s backs, pulling together to pick up slack. This gracious dynamic allows for growth and development and a better creative environment. As the resident writer, it takes the pressure off to know that we, as a team, are shoulder to shoulder in carrying the vision of the agency into the future.

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5 key metrics to track every month

5 key metrics to track every month

Abdul Govender

02/13/2019

In the current age of digital marketing, having an active social media presence is important. For many businesses, this means ticking the right boxes – you’ve set up the various social accounts such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram; you respond to questions; follow fans; post important news; and thank your customers for their support.

 

But, what are you doing to track and monitor these social interactions? If you’re engaging on social media, then you should make the time to measure these activities, and understand what it all means.

 

In this blog post, I’ll explain five metrics you should keep track of on a monthly basis.  

Reach

Reach is an old-school marketing metric that still remains important today. It indicates how far your message is traveling and how many eyes are seeing it. Measuring reach on social media can be misleading at times as it only shows how many people potentially saw your post or that it was made available. Unlike engagement, which gives a number of likes, reach is really just an estimate.

Engagement is queen

Engagement is, hands down, one of the most important metrics you should be concerned with on social media. It is the catalyst for improvement in all of the other social media metrics.

 

Simply put, engagement measures the number of likes, shares, and comments that your social updates receive.

Having a large reach with low engagement is a bad sign because it shows that you don’t have a marketing message or content that resonates with your target audience. Reaching tons of people means nothing if they aren’t interested in what you have to offer or share. As long as your audience is engaged, no matter how small that audience is, it will grow organically.

Never underestimate the power of influence

 Who is talking about your brand and what kind of impact do they have? Influence could be seen as a controversial social media metric, but there are countless tools that measure social influence, and they all do it in different ways. But one thing they all agree on is that audience size does not necessarily relate to influence. Just because someone has a lot of friends or followers, that doesn’t mean they can encourage those followers to actually do something.

 

Based on past actions, we can make assumptions about how influential someone might be in the future. This type of potential influence is useful to decide who to reach out to when you’re preparing for a campaign.

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The art of the chase – leads

Once your social media accounts start gaining traction, it’s easy to get caught up in how many likes and shares you’re getting. It feels good to see people enjoying your content, but what about the bottom-line? To ensure you are getting the best from your social media efforts, you have to ask the tough question: how many of these engaged fans are actually interested in purchasing my product?

 

You might have an enormous following on Instagram because people love your photos, but how does that translate to new leads or sales? To put it another way, say you have a small following on LinkedIn, but it consistently generates new leads. Which one deserves more attention?

 

If you aren’t generating leads, you’re either on the wrong platform or your content isn’t engaging to your buyer persona. The sooner you identify the problem, the better – but you have to start tracking the stats to find out.

Know what has been said – the share of voice

Finally, to really understand how well you’re doing on social media, you should consider a share of voice metric. How does the conversation about your brand compare to conversations about your competitors? Determine what percentage of the overall conversation about your industry is focused on your brand compared to your main competitors. And learn from your competitors’ successes; since so many of these social media conversations are public, you can measure your competitors’ impact just as easily as you can measure your own.

 

If you’d like to understand how your brand measures up, or build brand awareness and a meaningful relationship with your audience, then get in touch with us.

We’d love to help you better understand the impact and effectiveness of your social media activity.

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